Monday, April 22, 2013

North Carolina Senate bill S.B. 648 could be health risk and risk your children again to mad cow type disease BSE TSE prion disease

Letter: Senate bill could be health risk


Monday, April 22, 2013


In 2008, 143 million pounds of beef were recalled by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The recall, the largest of beef in U.S. history, was initiated because dairy cows too sick to walk were forced, through violent abuse, to slaughter by forklifts.


Aside from welfare concerns for the cattle, slaughtering animals that cannot walk is dangerous. Difficulty standing is a symptom of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), or mad cow disease. When non-ambulatory cows are slaughtered and ground into burgers, humans may consume BSE-infected beef and develop a fatal brain infection.


The USDA only became aware of this health risk after the release of an undercover video from a slaughter plant. So why are North Carolina legislators trying to criminalize whistleblowers with Senate Bill 648?


S.B. 648 will prevent undercover investigators from exposing dangerous food safety issues that could jeopardize our nation’s health. Please oppose S.B. 648.


BRITTANY DAIL


Ayden










April 4, 2013
 
 
*S648-v-1*
 
 
A BILL TO BE ENTITLED 1
 
 
AN ACT TO CREATE THE CRIMINAL OFFENSE OF EMPLOYMENT FRAUD, TO 2 PROHIBIT PREDATORY THIRD-PARTY FINANCING OF LITIGATION BY 3 ASSIGNMENT OF PLAINTIFF'S RIGHT TO RECEIVE PROCEEDS, AND TO 4 CREATE TRANSPARENCY IN CONTRACTS THE ATTORNEY GENERAL ENTERS 5 INTO WITH PRIVATE ATTORNEYS TO REPRESENT THE STATE. 6
 
 
The General Assembly of North Carolina enacts: 7
 
 
SECTION 1. Article 19 of Chapter 14 of the General Statutes is amended by 8 adding a new section to read:
 
 

10 "§ 14-105.1. Employment fraud.
 
 
 
 
(a) It is unlawful for any person to willfully make false statements or representations or 11 to fail to disclose requested information as part of an employment application that the person 12 knows to be false or incomplete for the purpose of gaining access to the employer's facilities to 13 do any of the following: 14
 
 

(1) To create or produce a record that reproduces an image or sound occurring 15 within the employer's facility, including a photographic, video, or audio 16 medium record. 17
 
 

(2) To capture or remove data, paper, records, or any other documents through 18 duplication, downloading, image capture, electronic mail, electronic transfer, 19 or other means. 20
 
 

(b) A person who commits an offense under subsection (a) of this section is guilty of an 21 offense punishable as follows: 22
 
 

(1) For the first conviction, the person is guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor. 23
 
 

(2) For a second or subsequent conviction, the person is guilty of a Class I 24 felony. 25
 
 

(c) Any recording made or information obtained pursuant to subsection (a) of this 26 section shall be turned over to local law enforcement within 24 hours of recording or 27 procurement. No recording or information submitted under this subsection shall be spliced, 28 edited, or manipulated in any way prior to its submission. 29
 
 

(d) Any person who fails to turn over a record as required by subsection (c) of this 30 section is guilty of an offense punishable as follows: 31
 
 

(1) For the first conviction, the person is guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor. 32
 
 

(2) For a second or subsequent conviction, the person is guilty of a Class I 33 felony." 34
 
 

SECTION 2. Chapter 75 of the General Statutes is amended by adding a new 35 Article to read:
 
 

SNIP...see full text ;
 
 
 
 


 

 


PLEASE be aware, for 4 years, the USDA fed our children all across the Nation (including TEXAS) dead stock downer cows, the most high risk cattle for BSE aka mad cow disease and other dangerous pathogens.


who will watch our children for CJD for the next 5+ decades ???


WAS your child exposed to mad cow disease via the NSLP ???


SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM FROM DOWNER CATTLE UPDATE












DID YOUR CHILD CONSUME SOME OF THESE DEAD STOCK DOWNER COWS, THE MOST HIGH RISK FOR MAD COW DISEASE ???


you can check and see here ;









Wednesday, March 14, 2012


PINK SLIME, MRM’s, BSE AKA MAD COW DISEASE, AND THE USDA NSLP









Friday, April 19, 2013


FDA BSE TSE PRION NEWS FEED AND ANNUAL INSPECTION OF FEED MILLS REPORTS HAS CEASED TO EXIST







Saturday, December 15, 2012


Bovine spongiform encephalopathy: the effect of oral exposure dose on attack rate and incubation period in cattle -- an update 5 December 2012







Tuesday, March 5, 2013


Use of Materials Derived From Cattle in Human Food and Cosmetics; Reopening of the Comment Period FDA-2004-N-0188-0051 (TSS SUBMISSION)


FDA believes current regulation protects the public from BSE but reopens comment period due to new studies







Wednesday, February 20, 2013


World Organization for Animal Health Recommends United States' BSE Risk Status Be Upgraded


Statement from Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack:







Thursday, February 14, 2013


The Many Faces of Mad Cow Disease Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy BSE and TSE prion disease












Thursday, February 21, 2013


National Prion Disease Pathology Surveillance Center Cases Examined January 16, 2013









16 YEAR OLD SPORADIC FFI ?






Monday, January 14, 2013


Gambetti et al USA Prion Unit change another highly suspect USA mad cow victim to another fake name i.e. sporadic FFI at age 16 CJD Foundation goes along with this BSe









Monday, December 31, 2012


Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease and Human TSE Prion Disease in Washington State, 2006–2011-2012









Tuesday, December 25, 2012


CREUTZFELDT JAKOB TSE PRION DISEASE HUMANS END OF YEAR REVIEW DECEMBER 25, 2012









Tuesday, June 26, 2012


Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease Human TSE report update North America, Canada, Mexico, and USDA PRION UNIT as of May 18, 2012


type determination pending Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease (tdpCJD), is on the rise in Canada and the USA









Wednesday, June 13, 2012


MEXICO IS UNDER or MIS DIAGNOSING CREUTZFELDT JAKOB DISEASE AND OTHER PRION DISEASE SOME WITH POSSIBLE nvCJD









*** The discovery of previously unrecognized prion diseases in both humans and animals (i.e., Nor98 in small ruminants) demonstrates that the range of prion diseases might be wider than expected and raises crucial questions about the epidemiology and strain properties of these new forms. We are investigating this latter issue by molecular and biological comparison of VPSPr, GSS and Nor98.



VARIABLY PROTEASE-SENSITVE PRIONOPATHY IS TRANSMISSIBLE ...price of prion poker goes up again $



OR-10: Variably protease-sensitive prionopathy is transmissible in bank voles



Romolo Nonno,1 Michele Di Bari,1 Laura Pirisinu,1 Claudia D’Agostino,1 Stefano Marcon,1 Geraldina Riccardi,1 Gabriele Vaccari,1 Piero Parchi,2 Wenquan Zou,3 Pierluigi Gambetti,3 Umberto Agrimi1 1Istituto Superiore di Sanit√†; Rome, Italy; 2Dipartimento di Scienze Neurologiche, Universit√† di Bologna; Bologna, Italy; 3Case Western Reserve University; Cleveland, OH USA



Background. Variably protease-sensitive prionopathy (VPSPr) is a recently described “sporadic”neurodegenerative disease involving prion protein aggregation, which has clinical similarities with non-Alzheimer dementias, such as fronto-temporal dementia. Currently, 30 cases of VPSPr have been reported in Europe and USA, of which 19 cases were homozygous for valine at codon 129 of the prion protein (VV), 8 were MV and 3 were MM. A distinctive feature of VPSPr is the electrophoretic pattern of PrPSc after digestion with proteinase K (PK). After PK-treatment, PrP from VPSPr forms a ladder-like electrophoretic pattern similar to that described in GSS cases. The clinical and pathological features of VPSPr raised the question of the correct classification of VPSPr among prion diseases or other forms of neurodegenerative disorders. Here we report preliminary data on the transmissibility and pathological features of VPSPr cases in bank voles.



Materials and Methods. Seven VPSPr cases were inoculated in two genetic lines of bank voles, carrying either methionine or isoleucine at codon 109 of the prion protein (named BvM109 and BvI109, respectively). Among the VPSPr cases selected, 2 were VV at PrP codon 129, 3 were MV and 2 were MM. Clinical diagnosis in voles was confirmed by brain pathological assessment and western blot for PK-resistant PrPSc (PrPres) with mAbs SAF32, SAF84, 12B2 and 9A2.



Results. To date, 2 VPSPr cases (1 MV and 1 MM) gave positive transmission in BvM109. Overall, 3 voles were positive with survival time between 290 and 588 d post inoculation (d.p.i.). All positive voles accumulated PrPres in the form of the typical PrP27–30, which was indistinguishable to that previously observed in BvM109 inoculated with sCJDMM1 cases.



In BvI109, 3 VPSPr cases (2 VV and 1 MM) showed positive transmission until now. Overall, 5 voles were positive with survival time between 281 and 596 d.p.i.. In contrast to what observed in BvM109, all BvI109 showed a GSS-like PrPSc electrophoretic pattern, characterized by low molecular weight PrPres. These PrPres fragments were positive with mAb 9A2 and 12B2, while being negative with SAF32 and SAF84, suggesting that they are cleaved at both the C-terminus and the N-terminus. Second passages are in progress from these first successful transmissions.



Conclusions. Preliminary results from transmission studies in bank voles strongly support the notion that VPSPr is a transmissible prion disease. Interestingly, VPSPr undergoes divergent evolution in the two genetic lines of voles, with sCJD-like features in BvM109 and GSS-like properties in BvI109.



The discovery of previously unrecognized prion diseases in both humans and animals (i.e., Nor98 in small ruminants) demonstrates that the range of prion diseases might be wider than expected and raises crucial questions about the epidemiology and strain properties of these new forms. We are investigating this latter issue by molecular and biological comparison of VPSPr, GSS and Nor98.








Wednesday, March 28, 2012


VARIABLY PROTEASE-SENSITVE PRIONOPATHY IS TRANSMISSIBLE, price of prion poker goes up again $









Sunday, March 31, 2013


Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease CJD worlds youngest documented victim, 11 years old, shall we pray








Monday, April 15, 2013


Dr. Stephen B. Thacker Director Centers for Disease Control and Prevention′s Office of Science, Epidemiology and Laboratory Services (OSELS) dies from Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease CJD








Sunday, August 21, 2011
 
 
The British disease, or a disease gone global, The TSE Prion Disease
(see video here)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
U.S.A. HIDING MAD COW DISEASE VICTIMS AS SPORADIC CJD ?
 
 
(see video at bottom)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sunday, September 6, 2009
 
 
MAD COW USA 1997
 
 
(SEE SECRET VIDEO)
 
 
 
 



TSS

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